Walcha Bag Ladies competition winner

Walcha bag lady Cherie Pethard and Walcha Together president Chris Page present bring your own bag winner Sue Reardon with a Walcha IGA shopping voucher.
Walcha bag lady Cherie Pethard and Walcha Together president Chris Page present bring your own bag winner Sue Reardon with a Walcha IGA shopping voucher.

The first winner of the bring your own bag competition being run by the Walcha bag ladies has been announced.

Mrs Sue Reardon was delighted to win the $50 shopping voucher which was given to her by the president of Walcha Together, Chris Page.

Walcha Together donated the money behind the competition which continues with the next winner to be announced on Monday.

To be in the draw, simply bring your own bag to shop and drop your receipt with your name and phone number written on it into the box at IGA or Foodworks.

It is estimated Australian use about 4 billion single-use plastic bags a year. Clean Up Australia estimates around 50 million plastic bags end up in waterways and oceans.

Clean Up Australia also warns that plastic bags don't go away, they simply break up into smaller pieces of plastic, making them much more likely to be eaten by wildlife. 

Plastic bags are recyclable. Reusing single-use plastic bags as bin liners mean that they end up in municipal waste streams, and as a result, are never recycled.

Plastic bags are made from non-renewable resources such as crude oil, gas and coal. If plastic is not recycled, this embodied energy is lost from the resource chain.

Plastic bags, including thicker reusable plastic bags sold at supermarket checkouts, can be recycled at supermarkets. 

There is currently no national standard to verify whether plastic bags that claim to be biodegradable actually break down.

According to Sustainability Victoria, even if biodegradable bags break down, it is unknown what is left over after the biodegradation process.

Producing biodegradable bags still requires similar energy, water and resources as regular single use plastic bags.