Walcha golfers support ovarian cancer research

Walcha golfers turning Teal: If women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer at an early stage, they have a 44 per cent chance of being alive and well five years later.
Walcha golfers turning Teal: If women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer at an early stage, they have a 44 per cent chance of being alive and well five years later.

Walcha’s women golfers held their annual charity golf day last week and they’ve changed from pink to teal to spread the cash among those who need it.

“For the last eight years we have held a pink day supporting the McGrath Foundation,” said avid golfer Vicki Heffernan.

“This year we have changed to supporting Ovarian Cancer Australia. The official colour used by the foundation is teal. So we had our first ‘Teal Day’.”

Teal outfits were worn by all 24 players who formed eight teams of three.

“Congratulations to our winning team for the day, Vicki Szipitalak, Julie Hoad and Deb Richards,” Mrs Heffernan said.

“We were very pleased to raise $800 to go towards ovarian cancer research. Many thanks to our sponsors, including Sal and Bruce Rutherford, Peter King and Sarah Bruce.”

Mrs Heffernan explained that one of the reasons the change was made was because ovarian cancer is the deadliest of all women’s cancers. Each year in Australia, approximately 1580 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer and more than 1047 women die from the disease. Ovarian cancer cannot be detected by a pap test or cervical smear.

“There is no early detection test for ovarian cancer so the best way of detecting the disease is to know and recognise the signs and symptoms,” she said. 

The four types of symptoms most frequently reported are: abdominal or pelvic pain; increased abdominal size or bloating; frequent urination and feeling full easily.