REAL AUSTRALIA

Six of the best on Sunday: The benefits of utter dedication explained

Voice of Real Australia is a regular newsletter from Australian Community Media, which has journalists in every state and territory. Sign up here to get it by email, or here to forward it to a friend.

We've handpicked some Sunday reading in the hope you get a little quiet time today. Through our reporters meet some people you might not have otherwise come across - Jarrod Emeny, Craig O'Shannessy and Eliana Robinson. They are unique but united by a common trait - utter dedication.

THE LAND: 'You're just saying in your head, don't be dead'

Jarrod Emeny was 17 when his life intrinsically changed. He spent nine days in ICU, six weeks in the spinal ward at Royal North Shore Hospital and two months at Royal Rehab. His approach to his recovery - and new life - is nothing short of remarkable. Reporter Lucy Kinbacher spent time with him: read on - and listen to the podcast, too.

Craig O'Shannessy believes Novak Djokovic is on track to win more grand slams than Roger Federer. Photo: James Wiltshire

Craig O'Shannessy believes Novak Djokovic is on track to win more grand slams than Roger Federer. Photo: James Wiltshire

BORDER MAIL: Craig O'Shannessy talks about his rise to Novak Djokovic's strategic analyst

From Albury's Forrest Hill Tennis Club to a key member to world No.1 Novak Djokovic's team? Yes, that's life for Craig O'Shannessy who lists his occupation as strategic analyst. He travels the world but reporter Brett Kohlhagen just needed to pop down to Wodonga to catch up with O'Shannessy. Read on

Eliana Robinson completed her walk to Hobart running on sheer determination. Photo: Scott Gelston

Eliana Robinson completed her walk to Hobart running on sheer determination. Photo: Scott Gelston

THE EXAMINER: Broke, homeless but I did walk from Launceston to Hobart

Two weeks after setting out from Launceston and travelling on foot along the Midland Highway, sleeping in public bathrooms and staying up all night in roadhouses, surviving on muesli bars and the goodwill of strangers, Eliana Robinson arrived at the Elizabeth Street Mall in Hobart and sent a text message. Exhausted, freezing, recovering from two bouts of hypothermia and with no home to go back to, the 29-year-old was elated. Reporter Frances Vinall touched base with Eliana and learnt about persistence and the kindness of strangers. Read on

CENTRAL WESTERN DAILY: I renovated a house on Woodward Street for Airbnb

In December last year reporter Alex Rowe bucked the millennials' fail-at-home-ownership trend to purchase a property in the NSW Central West city of Orange. In keeping with the millennials' dig-the-gig economy trend, she decided to renovate the three-bedroom home to list it on Airbnb. The lessons she learnt? Read on.

Katherine Stores passed through many hands during its long history as one of the town's main general stores.

Katherine Stores passed through many hands during its long history as one of the town's main general stores.

KATHERINE TIMES: The store which made history, sadly may become part of it

The Katherine Stores arrived just a few decades after the town was properly founded, and it has been closely associated throughout most all of the town's history. An older sign above Five Star Supermarket reading Katherine Stores, est. 1926., is the best giveaway to its establishment. But a dwindling customer base has recently forced management to close the store. Before the bombing, before Tindal, before the flood, it was the buzz of the town. Read on

 The sculpture stands proudly at the entrance to the Blackall racecourse. Photo: Sally Cripps

The sculpture stands proudly at the entrance to the Blackall racecourse. Photo: Sally Cripps

QUEENSLAND COUNTRY LIFE: Legendary bush racehorse immortalised

One of the greatest racehorses the bush, and Australia, has ever seen has now been recognised with a statue in her hometown of Blackall. Although the chestnut mare with the baldy face set a national record on a cold day in Longreach in 1989 that was only broken by Black Caviar and then Winx, the name of Miss Petty has until now been known mostly in the bush. Reporter Sally Cripps explains: read on

Enjoy Sunday.

Sign up below to receive the Voice of Real Australia newsletter direct to your inbox each weekday.

And in other news ...