Namoi Unlimited teams up with Team Rubicon Australia to help deliver Litres for the Land project to North West

HELPING HAND: Team Rubicon Australia has begun rolling it out is Litres for the Land project . Photo: Team Rubicon Australia
HELPING HAND: Team Rubicon Australia has begun rolling it out is Litres for the Land project . Photo: Team Rubicon Australia

AN international disaster relief organisation is set to help drought-stricken people in need of water across the region.

Team Rubicon - made up of returned military personnel and former emergency service workers - has dealt with such disasters as 2017's Hurricane Harvey in Texas, and Cyclone Debbie in Queensland.

Now the Australian chapter will bring its Litres for the Land project to the region, thanks to the Namoi Unlimited Joint Organisation (JO).

The project, operating in conjunction with Clubs NSW, will provide locals access to potable water, through Team Rubicon's disaster relief teams and local water carting services.

Namoi Unlimited executive officer Rebel Thomson said "water was a top priority" for all five members of the JO.

"Team Rubicon contacted us directly to let us know about the project," Ms Thomson told the Leader.

"Each council within the JO is addressing its water problems differently, but this project will certainly help many people in need across the board.

"All of the member councils will be taking part in the project, with the exception of Gwydir, which is already carting water to those in need within the shire."

Team Rubicon members have begun feasibility studies within the region, beginning in Walcha on Monday, and followed by Tamworth and Gunnedah.

"Basically, Team Rubicon will be working very closely with all of the councils, as well as community support groups such as the Rural Financial Counselling Service, Lions clubs, Rotary clubs and the CWA," Ms Thomson said.

"Anyone in need of potable water is encouraged to go to one of those groups, or their local council, and we can try to get them involved in the project."

Liverpool Plains Shire mayor Andrew Hope said the project could be "a win-win" for locals.

"The project essentially tries to help locals needing water by organising local water carters to get them water," Cr Hope said.

"By doing it this way, people who are in dire need of water are getting the help they need while not taking away from local businesses that are also doing it tough.

"It's a great initiative and further proof the JO is doing all it can to help locals battling the drought."